at the point of
{prep.} Very near to; almost at or in. * /When Mary broke her favorite bracelet, she was at the point of tears./ * /The boy hurt in the accident lay at the point of death for a week, then he got well./ Compare: ABOUT TO(1), ON THE POINT OF.

Dictionary of American idioms. 2013.

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  • at the point of — {prep.} Very near to; almost at or in. * /When Mary broke her favorite bracelet, she was at the point of tears./ * /The boy hurt in the accident lay at the point of death for a week, then he got well./ Compare: ABOUT TO(1), ON THE POINT OF …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • At the point — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • at the tip of one's tongue — or[on the tip of one s tongue] {adv. phr.} {informal} 1. Almost spoken; at the point of being said. * /It was at the tip of my tongue to tell him, when the phone rang./ * /John had a rude answer on the tip of his tongue, but he remembered his… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • at the tip of one's tongue — or[on the tip of one s tongue] {adv. phr.} {informal} 1. Almost spoken; at the point of being said. * /It was at the tip of my tongue to tell him, when the phone rang./ * /John had a rude answer on the tip of his tongue, but he remembered his… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • on the point of — {prep.} Ready to begin; very near to. Usually used with a verbal noun. * /The coach was on the point of giving up the game when our team scored two points./ * /The baby was on the point of crying when her mother finally came home./ Compare: ABOUT …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • on the point of — {prep.} Ready to begin; very near to. Usually used with a verbal noun. * /The coach was on the point of giving up the game when our team scored two points./ * /The baby was on the point of crying when her mother finally came home./ Compare: ABOUT …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To turn the point of — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be at the bottom of — Bottom Bot tom (b[o^]t t[u^]m), n. [OE. botum, botme, AS. botm; akin to OS. bodom, D. bodem, OHG. podam, G. boden, Icel. botn, Sw. botten, Dan. bund (for budn), L. fundus (for fudnus), Gr. pyqmh n (for fyqmh n), Skr. budhna (for bhudhna), and Ir …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Point of concurrence — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Point of contrary flexure — Point Point, n. [F. point, and probably also pointe, L. punctum, puncta, fr. pungere, punctum, to prick. See {Pungent}, and cf. {Puncto}, {Puncture}.] 1. That which pricks or pierces; the sharp end of anything, esp. the sharp end of a piercing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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