be out to
{v. phr.} To intend to do; to plan to commit. * /The police felt that the gang may be out to rob another store./

Dictionary of American idioms. 2013.

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  • be out to — {v. phr.} To intend to do; to plan to commit. * /The police felt that the gang may be out to rob another store./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Out to out — Out Out (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • out to lunch — {adj.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. Gone for the midday meal. 2. Inattentive; daydreaming; inefficient; stupid. * /Neil Bender is just out to lunch today./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • out to lunch — {adj.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. Gone for the midday meal. 2. Inattentive; daydreaming; inefficient; stupid. * /Neil Bender is just out to lunch today./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • be out — {v. phr.} 1. To not be at home or at one s place of work. * /I tried to call but they told me that Al was out./ 2. To be unacceptable; not be considered; impossible. * /I suggested that we hire more salespeople but the boss replied that such a… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • be out — {v. phr.} 1. To not be at home or at one s place of work. * /I tried to call but they told me that Al was out./ 2. To be unacceptable; not be considered; impossible. * /I suggested that we hire more salespeople but the boss replied that such a… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To be out at the heels — Heel Heel, n. [OE. hele, heele, AS. h[=e]la, perh. for h[=o]hila, fr. AS. h[=o]h heel (cf. {Hough}); but cf. D. hiel, OFries. heila, h[=e]la, Icel. h[ae]ll, Dan. h[ae]l, Sw. h[ a]l, and L. calx. [root]12. Cf. {Inculcate}.] 1. The hinder part of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be out of one's head — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be gathered to one's fathers — Gather Gath er (g[a^][th] [ e]r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Gathered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Gathering}.] [OE. gaderen, AS. gaderian, gadrian, fr. gador, geador, together, fr. g[ae]d fellowship; akin to E. good, D. gaderen to collect, G. gatte husband, MHG …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be gathered to one's people — Gather Gath er (g[a^][th] [ e]r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Gathered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Gathering}.] [OE. gaderen, AS. gaderian, gadrian, fr. gador, geador, together, fr. g[ae]d fellowship; akin to E. good, D. gaderen to collect, G. gatte husband, MHG …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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