which

See: GAME AT WHICH TWO CAN PLAY.

Dictionary of American idioms. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Which — Which, pron. [OE. which, whilk, AS. hwilc, hwylc, hwelc, from the root of hw[=a] who + l[=i]c body; hence properly, of what sort or kind; akin to OS. hwilik which, OFries. hwelik, D. welk, G. welch, OHG. wel[=i]h, hwel[=i]h, Icel. hv[=i]l[=i]kr,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • which — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, of what kind, which, from Old English hwilc; akin to Old High German wilīh of what kind, which, Old English hwā who, gelīk like more at who, like Date: before 12th century 1. being what one or ones out of a …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • In Which We Serve — Infobox Film name = In Which We Serve caption = deletable image caption imdb id = 0034891 writer = Noel Coward starring = Noel Coward John Mills Bernard Miles Celia Johnson director = David Lean producer = Noel Coward music = Clifton Parker… …   Wikipedia

  • The Mysticete or whalebone whales having no true teeth after birth but with a series of plates of whalebone see Baleen hanging down from the upper jaw on each side thus making a strainer through which they receive the small animals upon which they feed — Cetacea Ce*ta ce*a, n. pl. [NL., from L. cetus whale, Gr. ?.] (Zo[ o]l.) An order of marine mammals, including the whales. Like ordinary mammals they breathe by means of lungs, and bring forth living young which they suckle for some time. The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The Denticete including the dolphins and sperm whale which have teeth Another suborder Zeuglodontia is extinct The Sirenia were formerly included in the Cetacea but are now made a separate order — Cetacea Ce*ta ce*a, n. pl. [NL., from L. cetus whale, Gr. ?.] (Zo[ o]l.) An order of marine mammals, including the whales. Like ordinary mammals they breathe by means of lungs, and bring forth living young which they suckle for some time. The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • every which way — adverb Etymology: probably by folk etymology from Middle English everich way every way Date: 1824 1. in every direction 2. in a disorderly manner ; irregularly < toys scattered about every which way > …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Bethlehem — ] which means fertile : There is a possible reference to it as Beth Lehem Ephratah. [] It is first mentioned in the Tanakh and the Bible as the place where the Abrahamic matriarch Rachel died and was buried by the wayside (Gen. 48:7). Rachel s… …   Wikipedia

  • MUSH — which was fundamentally a social game. MUSH has forked over the years and there are now different varieties with different features, although most have strong similarities and one who is fluent in coding one variety can switch to coding for the… …   Wikipedia

  • Wireless Markup Language — (which are gaining in popularity as processing power in mobile devices increases). WML historyBuilding on Openwave s HDML, Nokia s Tagged Text Markup Language (TTML) and Ericsson s proprietary markup language for mobile content, the WAP Forum… …   Wikipedia

  • Boline — which in most traditions is never used for actual physical cutting, the boline is used for cutting cords and herbs, carving candles, etc. It has a small, straight or crescent shaped blade and a handle which is traditionally white in colour.… …   Wikipedia

  • Economy of the Democratic Republic of the Congo — which has been at the heart of many struggles within the country for many decades, but particularly in the 1990s. NOTOC MiningIndustry, especially mining, remains a great potential source of wealth for DROC. In 1997, industry accounted for 16.9%… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.