play off

{v.} 1. To match opposing persons, forces, or interests so that they balance each other. * /The girl played off her admirers against each other./ * /Britain tried to play off European nations against each other so that she would have a balance of power./ 2. To finish the playing of (an interrupted contest.) * /The visitors came back the next Saturday to play off the game stopped by rain./ 3. To settle (a tie score) between contestants by more play. /When each player had won two matches, the championship was decided by playing off the tie./

Dictionary of American idioms. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • play off — transitive verb Date: 1606 1. a. to set in opposition for one s own gain b. to set in contrast 2. to complete the playing of (an interrupted contest) 3. to break (a tie) by a play off …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • play-off — noun Date: 1895 1. a final contest or series of contests to determine the winner between contestants or teams that have tied 2. a series of contests played after the end of the regular season to determine a championship often used in plural …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • To play off — Play Play, v. t. 1. To put in action or motion; as, to play cannon upon a fortification; to play a trump. [1913 Webster] First Peace and Silence all disputes control, Then Order plays the soul. Herbert. [1913 Webster] 2. To perform music upon; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To play off — Play Play, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Played}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Playing}.] [OE. pleien, AS. plegian, plegan, to play, akin to plega play, game, quick motion, and probably to OS. plegan to promise, pledge, D. plegen to care for, attend to, be wont, G.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Play — Play, v. t. 1. To put in action or motion; as, to play cannon upon a fortification; to play a trump. [1913 Webster] First Peace and Silence all disputes control, Then Order plays the soul. Herbert. [1913 Webster] 2. To perform music upon; as, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Play — Play, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Played}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Playing}.] [OE. pleien, AS. plegian, plegan, to play, akin to plega play, game, quick motion, and probably to OS. plegan to promise, pledge, D. plegen to care for, attend to, be wont, G.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Play (play) — Play is a one act play by Samuel Beckett. It was written between 1962 and 1963 and first produced in German as Spiel on 14 June 1963 at the Ulmer Theatre in Ulm Donau, Germany, directed by Deryk Mendel, with Nancy Illig (W1), Sigfrid Pfeiffer… …   Wikipedia

  • Play for Today — was a British television anthology drama series, produced by the BBC and transmitted on BBC1 from 1970 to 1984. Over three hundred original plays, most between an hour and ninety minutes in length, were transmitted during the fourteen year period …   Wikipedia

  • Off theory — is a bowling tactic in the sport of cricket. The term off theory is somewhat archaic and seldom used any more, but the basic tactic still plays a part in modern cricket. Off theory involves concentrating the line of the bowling attack just… …   Wikipedia

  • Play-by-play — Play by play, in broadcasting, is a North American term and means the reporting of a sporting event with a voiceover describing the details of the action of the game in progress. In North America, in many sports, the play by play person is… …   Wikipedia

  • Off — Off, prep. Not on; away from; as, to be off one s legs or off the bed; two miles off the shore. Addison. [1913 Webster] {Off hand}. See {Offhand}. {Off side} (Football), out of play; said when a player has got in front of the ball in a scrimmage …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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